Your submission was sent successfully! Close

Thank you for signing up for our newsletter!
In these regular emails you will find the latest updates from Canonical and upcoming events where you can meet our team.Close

Thank you for contacting our team. We will be in touch shortly.Close

  1. Blog
  2. Article

Dustin Kirkland
on 22 December 2015

More people use Ubuntu than anyone actually knows


People of earth, waving at Saturn, courtesy of NASA.

It Doesn’t Look Like Ubuntu Reached Its Goal Of 200 Million Users This Year”, says Michael Larabel of Phoronix, in a post that it seems he’s been itching to post for months.

Why the negativity?!? Are you sure? Did you count all of them?

No one has. And no one can count all of the Ubuntu users in the world!
Canonical, unlike Apple, Microsoft, Red Hat, or Google, does not require each user to register their installation of Ubuntu.

Of course, you can buy laptops preloaded with Ubuntu from Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Asus. And there are millions of them out there. And you can buy servers powered by Ubuntu from IBM, Dell, HP, Cisco, Lenovo, Quanta, and compatible with the OpenCompute Project.

In 2011, hardware sales might have been how Mark Shuttleworth hoped to reach 200M Ubuntu users by 2015.

But in reality, hundreds of millions of PCs, servers, devices, virtual machines, and containers have booted Ubuntu to date!
Let’s look at some facts…

  • Docker users have launched Ubuntu images over 35.5 million times.
  • HashiCorp’s Vagrant images of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS 64-bit have been downloaded 10 million times.
  • At least 20 million unique instances of Ubuntu have launched in public clouds, private clouds, and bare metal in 2015 itself.
    • That’s Ubuntu in clouds like AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Compute Engine, Rackspace, Oracle Cloud, VMware, and others.
    • And that’s Ubuntu in private clouds like OpenStack.
  • And Ubuntu at scale on bare metal with MAAS, often managed with Chef.
  • In fact, over 2 million new Ubuntu cloud instances launched in November 2015.
    • That’s 67,000 new Ubuntu cloud instances launched per day.
    • That’s 2,800 new Ubuntu cloud instances launched every hour.
    • That’s 46 new Ubuntu cloud instances launched every minute.
    • That’s nearly one new Ubuntu cloud instance launched every single second of every single day in November 2015.
  • And then there are Ubuntu phones from Meizu.
  • And more Ubuntu phones from BQ.
  • Of course, anyone can install Ubuntu on their Google Nexus tablet or phone.
  • Oh, and the Tesla entertainment system? All electric Ubuntu.
  • Google’s self-driving cars? They’re self-driven by Ubuntu.
  • George Hotz’s home-made self-driving car? It’s a homebrewed Ubuntu autopilot.
  • Snappy Ubuntu downloads and updates for Raspberry Pi’s and Beagle Bone Blacks — the response has been tremendous. Download numbers are astounding.

Drones, robots, network switches, smart devices, the Internet of Things. More Snappy Ubuntu.

Kicking PaaS with Cloud Foundry? App instances are Ubuntu LXC containers. Pivotal has lots of serious users.

 

How many “users” of Ubuntu are there ultimately? I bet there are over a billion people today, using Ubuntu — both directly and indirectly. Without a doubt, there are over a billion people on the planet benefiting from the services, security, and availability of Ubuntu today.

  • More people use Ubuntu than we know.
  • More people use Ubuntu than you know.
  • More people use Ubuntu than they know.
  • More people use Ubuntu than anyone actually knows.

Because of who we all are.

Read original article

Related posts


Oliver Smith
17 May 2024

Migrating from CentOS to Ubuntu: a guide for system administrators and DevOps

Cloud and server Article

CentOS 7 is on track to reach its end-of-life (EoL) on June 30, 2024. Post this date, the CentOS Project will cease to provide updates or support, including vital security patches. Moving away from the RHEL-based ecosystem might appear daunting, but if you’re considering Ubuntu the switch can be both straightforward and economically viabl ...


Simon Fels
20 March 2024

Implementing an Android™ based cloud game streaming service with Anbox Cloud

Cloud and server Article

Since the outset, Anbox Cloud was developed with a variety of use cases for running Android at scale. Cloud gaming, more specifically for casual games as found on most user’s mobile devices, is the most prominent one and growing in popularity. Enterprises are challenged to find a solution that can keep up with the increasing ...


Benjamin Ryzman
21 June 2024

Data Centre AI evolution: combining MAAS and NVIDIA smart NICs

AI Article

It has been several years since Canonical committed to implementing support for NVIDIA smart NICs in our products. Among them, Canonical’s metal-as-a-service (MAAS) enables the management and control of smart NICs on top of bare-metal servers. NVIDIA BlueField smart NICs are very high data rate network interface cards providing advanced s ...